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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 1  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 83-89

Detection of bacteria in endodontic samples and its association with defined clinical signs and symptoms of endodontic infection


1 Ministry of Health, Fujairah Dental Center, Fujairah, United Arab Emirates
2 Department of Restorative Dentistry, Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Mohammad A Al-Omari
Riyadh Colleges of Dentistry and Pharmacy, P.O. Box 84891, Riyadh 11681
Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1658-6816.138470

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Introduction : The role of bacteria in pulpal and periradicular lesions is well established. However, the association of bacterial species with signs and symptoms of endodontic infection is not well elucidated. The purpose of this study was to investigate the types of bacterial species in infected root canals (using MicroSeq 500 16S ribosomal ribonucleic acid, rRNA) and the association of bacterial species with clinical signs and symptoms of different pulpal and periapical infections. Materials and Methods: Microbial samples were obtained from 92 adult patients (one tooth with single root canal for each patient). Clinical data including signs and symptoms were collected. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (MicroSeq 500 16S rRNA) was used to detect bacteria in the infected root canals. Results: A total of 179 bacterial species were identified. Actinomyces viscosus and Streptococcus sanguis were associated with the presence of pain. While Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Veillonella spp. were associated with pain of palpation, the pain to percussion was associated with Actinomyces spp., Actinomyces naeslundii, and Actinomyces viscosus. Also, Streptococcus mitis, Bacteroides spp., and Veillonella spp. were associated with periapical swelling. The presence of sinus tract was found to be significantly associated with Neisseria spp. and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. The wet canal was significantly associated with the presence of Propionibacterium acnes and Bacteroides spp. Conclusions: There are significant associations between the presence of some bacterial species with clinical signs and symptoms of infected root canals.


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